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Gabriel Ortega the link between the adventures of Tintin and Alexander Von Humboldt.

In seeking to establish a link between the now iconic images of Georges Remi (Hergé) the creator of
the renowned 20th century European comics "The Adventures of Tintin" and the polymath
Alexander V. Humboldt known as the "scientific discoverer of the new mundo ”has promoted the
technical and conceptual consolidation of the work of the artist Gabriel Ortega. Who in a perennial
way has given longevity to the figure of Tintin in his plastic reproductions ranging from detailed and
neat sculptures to embroidery and paintings made in oil and gold foil.

Under the influence of Humboldt, the artist projects Tintin to highlight the way in which the
illustration of America underwent its fundamental renewal towards a representation based on the
scientific information that Humboldt provided after the theories of him and his "Pictures of Nature",
in which all the scientific information was reflected as of landscape painting, placing art at the
service of science. This is how, through the knowledge of the exotic forms of nature, especially
plants, Humboldt in his passage through Central America managed to enrich the récords of
European painting, whose artists began to seek new settings in the tropics, traveling to our regions
still unknown to many.

In this sense, the works of the artist Gabriel preserve the duality of two great characters, that of
Tintin an intrepid reporter who travels through the five continents baptized as "pure heart" and that
of Humboldt a great scientist, naturalist, botanist, geologist and great observer of the landscape to
give rise to the relevance of his visits to the new world.

The artist's technical mastery makes it possible to see Tintin again in his work, as the reporter
contemporary who with the spirit of him "Humboldtian" returns to see, feel and study the nature,
today so different from what Humboldt witnessed more than two hundred years ago and that is still
being exploited indefinitely.